The Quarterly Review, Volume 55

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John Murray, 1836
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Page 480 - See him in the dish, his second cradle, how meek he lieth! - wouldst thou have had this innocent grow up to the grossness and indocility which too often accompany maturer swinehood? Ten to one he would have proved a glutton, a sloven, an obstinate, disagreeable animal - wallowing in all manner of filthy conversation - from these sins he is happily snatched away Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, Death came with timely care...
Page 480 - His memory is odoriferous ; no clown curseth, while his stomach half rejecteth, the rank bacon ; no coalheaver bolteth him in reeking sausages ; he hath a fair sepulchre in the grateful stomach of the judicious epicure, and for such a tomb might be content to die.
Page 480 - ... and dulcifying a substance, naturally so mild and dulcet as the flesh of young pigs. It looks like refining a violet. Yet we should be cautious, while we condemn the inhumanity, how we censure the wisdom of the practice.
Page 480 - Whether, supposing that the flavour of a pig who obtained his death by whipping (per flagellationem extremam) superadded a pleasure upon the palate of a man more intense than any possible suffering we can conceive in the animal, is man justified in using that method of putting the animal to death ?
Page 461 - Locke, instructed and delighted the world. When the bookseller offered Milton five pounds for his Paradise Lost, he did not reject it, and commit his poem to the flames — nor did he accept the miserable pittance as the reward of his labours : he knew that the real price of his work was immortality, and that posterity would pay 'it.'f Mr.
Page 461 - I wish popularity : but it is that popularity, which follows, not that which is run after; it is that popularity which, sooner or later, never fails to do justice to the pursuit of noble ends, by noble means.
Page 479 - ... the hereditary failing of the first parent, yet manifest — his voice as yet not broken, but something between a childish treble, and a grumble — the mild forerunner, or prceludium, of a grunt.
Page 403 - His natural laws prevail in the heavens above, in the earth beneath, and in the waters under the earth...
Page 458 - ... in my chamber, that the shirts, waistcoats, and other garments I wear next my body, are sweet, beyond what either easily can be believed, or hath been observed in any else, which sweetness also was found to be in my breath above others, before I used to take tobacco, which towards my latter time I was forced to take against certain rheums and catarrhs that trouble me, which yet did not taint my breath for any long time...
Page 478 - THE HAUNCH OF VENISON. A POETICAL EPISTLE TO LORD CLARE. THANKS, my lord, for your venison, for finer or fatter Never rang'd in a forest, or smok'd in a platter ; The haunch was a picture for painters to study, The fat was so white, and the lean was so ruddy ; Though my stomach was sharp, I could scarce help regretting To spoil such a delicate picture by eating ; I had thoughts, in my chambers, to place it in view, To be shown to my friends as a piece of virtu ; As in some Irish houses, where things...

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